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The evolution of immigration in the U.S.

California residents may be interested in learning more about how immigration laws have changed the United States over time. the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 might have been the primary catalyst for shaping the scope of U.S. immigration as it currently exists today. The legislation marked the end of an immigration system that established a quota and higher priority for people immigration from European countries.

The act paved the way for more immigrants from Asia and Latin America to come and establish a home in the United States. As more baby boomers retire and exit the workforce, the immigration from Latin America has proven to be an essential source of labor in the modern United States. In 1965, immigrants accounted for less than 6 percent of the U.S. populace, and as of 2015, they account for 14 percent of the population. By 2065, immigrants are projected to constitute for 18 percent of the country's population.

Before the legislation was passed in '65, 70 percent of the visas were reserved for immigrants from the U.K., Germany and Ireland. However, these groups were not even using all the visas available to them. Since then, family immigration has had the highest priority in how visas are allocated amongst the incoming applicants. Since the act was passed, immigrants, their children and their grandchildren have accounted for 55 percent of the population growth in the United States.

People who need help with family-based immigration issues often benefit from the advice of a lawyer. Legal counsel may be qualified to review the specific circumstances and recommend the most advantageous course of action moving forward. Lawyers might be able to help immigrants obtain permission to apply for legitimate employment in the United States. People seeking asylum or anyone interested in having a foreign-born relative enter the country may also benefit from contacting legal counsel.

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  • American Immigration Lawyers Association
  • State Bar of California | California Board of Legal Specialization
  • Avvo
  • Orange County Bar Association
  • Irvine Chamber