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Posts tagged "Asylum"

Understanding the different types of asylum hearings

The asylum process can be different for everyone. One thing that most cases have in common, however, is that there will probably be an asylum hearing. An asylum hearing is a type of court hearing in which an immigration judge issues a ruling regarding an individual’s asylum process.

Affirmative Asylum vs. Defensive Asylum

If you are seeking asylum in the United States, you should know that there are two different types of asylum applications available to immigrants: The affirmative application, and the defensive application. Both are similar, but there are also some key differences that you should know about when choosing which application is the best fit for you.

Ukrainian boxer prevails in U.S. asylum case

Sometimes, a person no longer feels safe in their home country due to persecution they are facing. Some such individuals may look to the U.S. as a place to escape from such dangers. Seeking asylum in the U.S. may be an option for individuals who have faced certain types of persecution in their home country.

Asylees/refugees were the 2nd biggest group of U.S. green card recipients in 2015

There are several different paths to a green card here in the United States. U.S. immigration law creates a special such path for individuals granted asylum or admitted to the U.S. under refugee status.

What is the difference between the refugee and asylum processes?

Asylum and refugee are terms that many might hear together. So, one thing one might wonder is: Are the asylum process and refugee process two different processes in U.S. immigration law, or just different names for the same process?

Refugees in California

How many refugees who come to the U.S. come to California? According to data on refugees, California has seen 186,924 refugee arrivals between 1995 and 2016.

When an asylee has a child

There are certain family immigration options available to individuals who have received asylum status here in the United States. One is that, generally, if they have a child who was under the age of 21 and not married when they applied for asylum, they can request derivative asylum status for their child (such status would allow the child to live in the U.S. with them). This is the case whether the asylee is the child’s mother, father, adoptive parent (if certain timeframe rules are met) or step-parent.

  • American Immigration Lawyers Association
  • State Bar of California | California Board of Legal Specialization
  • Avvo
  • Orange County Bar Association
  • Irvine Chamber