The current administration recently cut access to sick and disabled migrants and their caretakers, telling them they have 33 days to leave the United States. The “medical deferred action” program has allowed them to remain on American soil while receiving life-saving medical treatment. The move is controversial because U.S. Citizen and Immigration Services cut the program without a moment’s notice, potentially leaving some patients on their deathbeds.

It’s one of the current administration’s many efforts to strip legal rights away for migrants and their families. These efforts have been especially harmful to children and those with disabilities.

Why are migrants coming to the U.S. for medical care?

Migrants with rare conditions and disabilities come to the U.S. because the same level of health care and rehabilitation are not available in their home countries. Plus, many of them weren’t coming to the U.S. uninvited. Others were requested by American physicians to participate in clinical trials for new therapies.

What led to up to program cuts and what are the consequences?

Before the program was gutted, the current administration put limits on judges so that they couldn’t toss out deportation cases, especially ones with sympathetic circumstances. As a result, not only are sick and disabled migrants now at risk for being sent home, but so are their caretakers.

Families can fight back

Forced deportation can be terrifying and if you or a family member are in the U.S. for quality medical treatment, your stay could be a matter of life and death. But, with the right attorney, you can fight for your legal right to remain in America while you continue treatment.